Home » Wissensdatenbank » Year of publication » 2017 » Recovery of salt marsh vegetation after removal of storm-deposited anthropogenic debris

Kaitlin M. Ehl, Steve M. Raciti, Jason D. Williams, Recovery of salt
marsh vegetation after removal of storm-deposited anthropogenic debris:
Lessons from volunteer clean-up efforts in Long Beach, NY, Marine
Pollution Bulletin, Volume 117, Issues 1–2, 15 April 2017, Pages
436-447, ISSN 0025-326X, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.marpolbul.2017.01.086.
(http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0025326X17301157)
Abstract: Abstract
Recovery of vegetation on a Long Island, NY salt marsh was investigated
after the removal of hurricane-deposited large wooden debris through
managed clean-ups involving volunteers. Two years after the removal of
the debris, vegetation cover and species composition were not
significantly different from controls. There was no significant
difference in vegetation recovery among fall and spring debris removal
treatments. Initial vegetation cover of the experimental and control
plots was 95.8% and 1.2%, respectively; after two growing seasons cover
was 78.7% and 71.2%, respectively. The effects of trampling by
volunteers during debris removal were monitored and after one growing
season, trails used during a single clean-up effort had a mean
vegetation cover of 67% whereas those that were used during multiple
clean-up efforts had only 30% cover. We use the results of this study to
offer guidance for organizing effective salt marsh clean-up efforts.
Keywords: Clean-ups; Distichlis; Marine debris; New York; Salt marsh
vegetation; Spartina



Recovery of salt marsh vegetation after removal of storm-deposited anthropogenic debris

5. Juni 2017